Month: November 2016

Guest Blog: Why have we started painting our doors?

Guest Blog: Why have we started painting our doors?

Peninsula Care Homes Care Manager, Margaret Haxton, reveals why we have decided to start painting our doors.

DOOR: a movable barrier used to open and close the entrance to a building, room, cupboard, or vehicle, usually a solid panel, hinged to or sliding in a frame.
SYNONYMS: portal, opening, hatch, entrance, entry, exit, egress.

iconic-doors-blog
10 Downing Street: The door to democratic leadership

You may notice that we have started to paint internal doors in some of our homes. We were initially inspired to paint shared bathroom doors a different colour as research suggests this will assist residents in identifying the bathroom.

More recently we have commenced a programme of painting front doors. Peninsula Care Homes see our resident’s doors as the entrance to their individual lifestyles. Where possible residents are able to choose the shade of their front door from a range of colours. Benefits include helping residents find their own room and allows each resident to individualise the entrance to their room.

A relative who spoke on behalf of her mother was delighted that her mother was able to choose the colour of her new “Front Door” and as a team we had succeeded in providing personalised care.

Peninsula take pride in meeting all our resident’s needs in all aspects of their social and healthcare requirements, by adding small changes like ‘doors’ we also support residents in environment choices too. We are really pleased with the colourful results and hope you are too…

When we care for others we must open the door to our hearts, and never let the Key get rusty, if it does, lubricate it liberally with the Six C’s of Care:

Care, Compassion, Competence, Communication, Courage, Commitment

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The power of music and a possible Christmas gift suggestion

The power of music and a possible Christmas gift suggestion

Music has been shown in studies to have a dramatic effect in helping those living with dementia. Whether it’s classical, opera, songs from shows or ‘60s music can sooth, stimulate and bring to mind long-forgotten memories.

The power of music, in particular singing seems to reach parts of the brain in ways other forms of communication cannot.  Studies by Professor Paul Robertson says as the ‘auditory system of the brain is first to fully function at 16 weeks, which means you are musically receptive long before anything else.  The study argues that it’s a case of first in, last out when it comes to dementia-type breakdown of memory.’

Go into any of our homes and you will often hear music being played, residents singing, musical instruments being played and a huge variety of musical entertainers visiting.  We like entertainers that engage – you may find residents & staff dancing to music being played, or singing, whistling, clapping or just tapping their feet.  We are constantly changing our entertainers although some homes continue to have firm favourites. We do ask that our entertainers provide a broad repertoire so there is something for everyone.

A very moving clip is Gladys Wilson with Naomi Fells which we believe clearly demonstrates the power of music.  It really is worth watching https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrZXz10FcVM

Looking for a Christmas present idea then what about using an ipod and creating a bespoke playlist.  Think about the songs that you heard playing when growing up, perhaps include the song your relative had as their first dance at their wedding, music from a show they love, a hymn, lullaby the possibilities are endless.  If you want suggestions on what to include then we suggest reading the Playlist for Life “How to make a playlist for life.”  Alternatively you could fill an ipod with a range of music including wartime memories, Nat King Cole, Glenn Miller, 50’s rock & roll, Elvis, Beatles, Elton John, classical music as possibilities.

Ian Donaghy, author of ‘Dear Dementia’ says “the power of music – it creates togetherness, a sense of belonging.  Some songs make you laugh others make you cry but they can all remind us who we are.”

We hope to hear some favourite playlists soon

Chernobyl Children’s Lifeline

Chernobyl Children’s Lifeline

This week our homes will be joining in efforts to raise money for Children in Need.  We thought we would take this opportunity to tell you about another charity we support helping children.  For the last two years Peninsula Care Homes has paid for hotel accommodation for the children at Heathrow on their last night in the U.K., which has been greatly appreciated by the children, their group leader and the charity.

The Chernobyl disaster occurred on 26th April 1986 when the fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant near Belaurus exploded. It is thought it will take 400 years to rid the area of contamination.

Chernobyl Children’s Lifeline was established in 1992.  Because of the charity some 60,000 children from Belarus have visited Britain. Whilst here they receive some basic medical attention including dental care and eye examination. The month break is thought to boost their damaged immune system and improve their quality of life.

chernobyl-children-lifeline-local-trips

Our local Totnes & South Hams link hosted 8 children last year. They arrived in Devon with no English, very little clothes for their month stay.  In addition to medical treatment they got to enjoy Devon.  Each year a range of fun activities are enjoyed which can include a ride on a Rib, tea party at the Winking Prawn in Salcombe, horse riding, surf lesson, first trip to the seaside and making sandcastles, visits to local attractions.  They return home after their medical treatment, fun in Devon and a huge bag full of clothes for themselves and to share with their siblings.

If you think you could host two children or donate please visit www.ccll.org.uk

World Nursery Rhyme Week

World Nursery Rhyme Week

This week its World Nursery Rhyme Week and having recently visited Cornerways with my one year old son, Jack, it appears nursery rhymes are similar to Christmas Carols you never seem to forget them.  Jack had a gentleman sing “Humpty Dumpty”  whilst a lady recited “Pat a cake” complete with actions.  

Do you have a favourite that you could recite?  I seem to find myself singing “twinkle twinkle little star” and it does help Jack go to sleep probably because he’s had enough of my singing.  We go to swimming lessons each week and all techniques are learnt whilst singing nursery rhymes: “12345 Once I Caught A Fish Alive”, “The Grand Old Duke of York” to name a few.

I hadn’t until recently ever considered how important nursery rhymes are in early childhood development. Some experts claim that if a child knows eight nursery rhymes by heart by the time they are four, they are usually amongst the best readers and spellers in their class.  Nursery rhymes are great way to learn early phonic skills, they provide practice in pitch, volume as well as language rhythm.  Experts believe that its not just language development they help with its cognitive development, physical development, aid with maths, as well as providing social/emotional development.  With all these benefits we will certainly keep reciting nursery rhymes to our little one.

In the spirit of World Nursery Rhyme Week, Parkland House residents spent an afternoon this week reciting nursery rhymes and reminiscing about their favourite childhood rhymes. All the residents remembered all the words and thoroughly enjoyed the activity.

parkland-house-resident-nursery-rhyme-afternoon

So in the Homes during World Nursery Rhyme Week  don’t be surprised if you hear staff and residents reminiscing on their favourite nursery rhymes, participating in nursery rhyme themed quizzes and perhaps making our own rhymes up.  If you have a little one or grand or even great grandchild there is some fantastic free resources available on Musicbugs website and in some local libraries.

http://www.musicbugs.co.uk/

Samaritan’s Purse – Operation Christmas Child

Samaritan’s Purse – Operation Christmas Child

Following last year’s success Coppelia residents have decided to support Samaritan’s Purse ‘Operation Christmas Child’. They are hoping to beat last year’s donation of 12 boxes.

When making up a box you decide boy or girl and which age bracket you would like to support. This year I’ve prepared a box for a boy and a girl both in the 2-4 age bracket. You also pay £3.00 towards shipping each box.

 

If you’d like to donate some new items, Coppelia are more than happy to receive donations. The local collection is November 5th but they will take boxes after that date to the main collection point too.

Samaritan’s Purse is an international relief and development organisation that works through local churches. Since 1990, 124 million children have received a Christmas shoe box in over 150 countries. We hope you’ll join us in helping children worldwide this Christmas.

samaritans-purse

https://www.samaritans-purse.org.uk/what-we-do/operation-christmas-child/how-to-pack-a-shoebox/