Category: Cupcake Day 16th June 16

Hot Breakfast Month

Hot Breakfast Month

February is National Hot Breakfast Month.  Within our homes porridge is a popular choice as is some or all elements of a full English Breakfast.  Breakfast is often reported to be the most important meal of the day with sayings “eat like a King at breakfast” often quoted.  It breaks the fast of the night and is important part of achieving good nutrition and hydration. Many of us grab something on the go, or quickly eat a bowl of cereal or round of toast before dashing off.  On these recent cold mornings something hot may break the cycle of coldness.

So what is your favourite hot breakfast?  In Japan the traditional breakfast would include rice, seafood and fermented foods.  In India different areas have their own traditions and specialities which may include stuffed breads and spicy vegetables.  In America the stack of pancakes, bacon and maple syrup is popular.    Other options you could consider eggs benedict, scrambled eggs on toast, and boiled eggs with soldiers, frittata, pancakes or waffles.

To accompany your hot breakfast what is your drink of choice: cold juice, nice cup of tea or a coffee? Or maybe you prefer brunch combining breakfast and lunch!

National Bird Feeding Month

National Bird Feeding Month

February is National Bird Feeding Month. It is a time to welcome back the birdsong and the early signs of Spring. As the February and March weather can be quite unpredictable, our homes have started to make simple bird feeders to hang in the gardens for our little friends. See our recipe for Bird cake below:

Make a speedy bird cake, this quick and easy cake to keep the birds happy!

You will need:

Good quality bird seed

Raisins

Peanuts

Grated cheese

Suet or lard

Yoghurt pots

String

Mixing bowl

Scissors

Important notes

Not suitable for people with nut allergies. Note that bird seed, including peanuts bought for birds, is not suitable for human consumption.

Step-by-step guide

  1. Carefully make a small hole in the bottom of a yoghurt pot. Thread string through the hole and tie a knot on the inside. Leave enough string so that you can tie the pot to a tree or your bird table.
  2. Allow the lard to warm up to room temperature, but don’t melt it. Then cut it up into small pieces and put it in the mixing bowl.
  3. Add the other ingredients to the bowl and mix them together with your finger tips. Keep adding the seed/raisin/cheese mixture and squidging it until the fat holds it all together.
  4. Fill your yoghurt pots with bird cake mixture and put them in the fridge to set for an hour or so.

Hang your speedy bird cakes from trees or your bird table. Watch for greenfinches, tits and possibly even great spotted woodpeckers.

Have fun bird watching!

National Hot Tea Month

National Hot Tea Month

January is National Hot Tea Month a fantastic excuse to have an extra cup of tea and indulge in a biscuit or piece of cake.

Tea has been drunk for thousands of years, originating from China. From there it grew in prominence until it was one of the most important beverages in the world. Some say it rivals coffee as the drink of choice for mornings.

Tea is mostly drunk hot but iced tea or cold tea because you simply forget to drink it while it was hot is often experienced.

What’s your favourite tea? We have arranged some tea tasting within the homes from fruit teas, herbal teas to different leaves of tea. Our tea tasting adds to our collection of activities to encourage hydration. We will see what the favourite is and then have the discussion on how to make the perfect cup of tea. Does the milk go in first or not at all, lemon, honey, weak tea or “builder’s brew”, cup and saucer or mug and so many choices.

Previous years tasting challenge of Cornerways had a winner of strawberry & raspberry tea with no one liking the peppermint tea.

So put the kettle on and enjoy your favourite tea whatever that may be. If you’re in Moretonhampstead on January 30th please do join our coffee/tea morning.

National Soup Month

National Soup Month

January 2020 is National Soup Month. The cold, dark (and mostly wet) days in January are often used as the perfect reason to indulge in a bowl or mug of your favourite hot soup.

There have been celebrated soup dates dating all the way back to around 20,000 B.C where boiling was not a common cooking technique until the invention of the waterproof container. Interestingly the word soup derives from the French word soupe, meaning broth or soup, which was then sold as a cheap meal by street vendors to provide an antidote to physical exhaustion. Serving soups then become popular in restaurants around the globe and many cookbooks were published offering the best recipes and methods for homemade soup.

Nowadays you will head to the canned food isles in the supermarket for a tin of soup. This is thanks to Chemist, Doctor John T. Dorrance, who back in 1897 invented condensed soup with household name Campbell Soup Company. Originally the cans required water or milk to be added to double the quantity, however this is no longer the case as soup tins have become a very popular “ready-to-eat” meal and a lunchtime favourite.

To celebrate the goodness a bowl of soup can bring the stomach and soul, we’ve been enjoying some favourite soups over the January month. We have also been trying recipes found in an old cookbook which was written by one of the ladies at Bramble Down Nursing Home.

There is no clear soup winner, but as we all know you can’t beat a bowl of hot tomato soup with crackers or bread. It is also said chicken soup can help you get over a cold! What is your favourite hot soup and how will you be celebrating this month?

Recruitment 2020

Recruitment 2020

Happy New Year everyone! We have some exciting new nursing job opportunities to start the year.

Are you looking for your first role as a registered nurse?

We will support you through the first months of your preceptorship allowing you to develop your nursing skills in a safe, nurturing environment. Our team of experienced registered nurses will be on hand to guide you through every aspect of your preceptorship pathway, allowing you to become a confident and competent practitioner.

We are also recruiting for an experienced day and night Registered Nurse to join our team.

Bramble Down Nursing Home is situated in the village of Denbury, between the market towns of Newton Abbot and Totnes.

Bramble Down has an excellent reputation offering what we sincerely believe is the highest standard of nursing and palliative care for up to 33 people. Our nursing team take responsibility to ensure the well being of the people living with us, which includes their physical, emotional and social needs. You will be expected to initiate, update and maintain automated care plans and medication charts. (Person Centred Software and eMAR) training provided.

Benefits:
Some of the benefits of working at Bramble Down Nursing Home include:
· Excellent Hourly Rate (£17.00 – £20.00 per hour)
· A named mentor to guide you
· Free DBS
· Free initial uniform
· Automatic enrolment to our pension scheme
· Unlimited access to our Refer a Friend bonus scheme currently £100
· Full-time and part-time hours offered
· Paid induction and training programmes
· Free onsite parking
· Free hot meal when working a 12 hour shift
· Access to a free independent & confidential helpline service
· Ongoing training & Development, supporting future revalidation

Experience & Qualifications:
· A valid NMC Pin
· To have a genuine passion to care for people
· Be able to communicate at all levels
· Be a team player
· Have exceptional organisational skills
· Willing to participate in Vocational Training Programmes

If this interest you, we would love to hear from you! Call us on 01392 346442 or email enquiries@peninsulacarehomes.co.uk for further information or for an informal chat.

Don’t forget you can also visit our Facebook page to find other job roles available across our five homes https://www.facebook.com/PeninsulaCareHomesLtd/

National Hobby Month

National Hobby Month

January is National Hobby Month. Perhaps the New Year Resolution is to try a new hobby or focus on the hobbies you enjoy.

Hobbies are great as they can relieve stress, challenge your brain, be social, good or bad for your health.

Within our homes we have individuals interested in so many different things. We try to cater for as many hobbies as possible. We have armchair exercises, gardening (vegetable allotment, flower arranging), music (playing instruments, outside entertainers, dancing and singing. Let’s not forget interest in animals, falconry, cooking, iPad clubs and knitting.

Which new hobbies are you going to set yourself this month?

Our homes are focusing on linking with their local communities including links with nursery’s and local schools. Perhaps one of your New Year goals is to take part in some volunteering, if so we would like to hear from you.

We have numerous activities you can get involved in throughout the month. Email enquiries@peninsulacarehomes.co.uk or call 01392 346442 for more information.

Guest Blog: Charlotte Willis shares her passion for #NationalDonorDay

Guest Blog: Charlotte Willis shares her passion for #NationalDonorDay

I’d like to introduce myself: my name is Charlotte. I’m 39 years old and I live in London. I’ve also lived in other cities too: Hong Kong, Amsterdam, Sydney, but my home, and my family and friends, are in the UK. I enjoy my job working in technology in Finance, and have worked hard to build a successful career after I finished university. Outside of work, I like to go to the theatre, see live music, watch movies (especially outdoor ones on summer evenings), and go for walks in the countryside at the weekend.

I enjoy doing ‘adventure’ sports too: skiing, surfing, and I used to trampoline competitively (at amateur level) until a few years ago. Last year I also sailed a quarter of the way around the world, crewing a 70ft ocean racing yacht as part of a global yacht race. I’ve run the London Marathon and completed the London Triathlon. I like to travel too, explore new countries and cultures, and count countries as I go – I’m up to 52!

I am a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) Ambassador and spent some time last year volunteering at a ‘code club’ teaching kids how to code computers. I try and find time to volunteer through my work too to encourage the next generation, especially girls, to consider technology as a career, and to recognise that not all technology jobs have to be ‘geeky’!

I’m very close to my parents and siblings and am enjoying seeing my 1-year old twin neices get more and more mischievous as they get older!

Oh and I’ve also had two kidney transplants. My kidneys failed unexpectedly and out of the blue when I was 12 years old and mine and my family’s lives were turned upside down overnight. A month later, a family unbeknownst to me lost their son in a car accident and they made the incredibly brave decision to donate his organs for transplant – I was the lucky recipient of one of his kidneys. Their selfless act meant that rather than being resigned to a continual whirlwind of hospitals, what-if conversations, medications, and operations, my life and importantly the lives of my parents and my siblings and all those close to us straightened out and returned to normal. A slightly new version of normal – I still take a small collection of pills twice a day – but I went home, I went back to school, my parents started to breathe a little more easily, and I got to live. And that’s an abiding part of the way I choose to live my life to this day; someone else made a decision that allowed me to carry on living when their son couldn’t and I am grateful for that every single day. Their son’s kidney graduated university with me, travelled the Trans-Siberian railway with me, ran the London Marathon with me. Through the anonymity of organ donation (the choice is up to the donor’s family) they have been such a huge part of my life and yet I have no idea who they are. I can’t change their story but they’ve changed mine and I take that responsibility seriously.

Transplanted organs don’t live forever yet (medical science is still working on that one) and in my late 20s, my donated kidney got too tired to keep me going at the level needed. Unlike the overnight bombshell the first time around though, this time we had time to plan and make choices, and in collaboration with the doctors, it was decided that my Dad would donate a kidney to me. He was 65 years old at the time but after passing all the medical tests, he had one kidney removed via keyhole surgery and it was transplanted into me, right next to my first donated kidney. It’s not uncommon for first transplants to be left where they are and mine still chugs away, doing what kidneys do, supporting my Dad’s kidney. So whilst it may have needed some extra help, it remains an important part of me. My Dad’s age and therefore the age of my second donated kidney isn’t an issue either – his kidney completed the London Triathlon with me, climbed the highest mountain in Borneo with me, and sailed 10,000 nautical miles with me across the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

Ten years down the line, both my Dad and I are fit and healthy, and life for us and our family has again carried on as it should. I turn 40 next year and I’m already planning how to mark the occasion! I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for my two kidneys donated by selfless, brave, and very special people. That car accident in 1990 that took one family’s son gave me, and everyone close to me, an opportunity to carry on living. Organ donation is a personal issue and one you will most likely have a view on, but I hope that my story also gives you a view of how ordinary people are leading ordinary lives, only made possible by extraordinary decisions. Make the extraordinary decisions in your life as they might save someone else’s.

The Great Big Rhino Project

The Great Big Rhino Project

The Great Big Rhino Project is a trail around the streets, parks and open spaces of the English Riviera and Exeter, and beyond.  For 10 weeks, life-size rhino sculptures will inhabit the streets, showcasing the wealth of artistic talent in the area, while highlighting the significant conservation threat facing wild rhinos and how the local business community can make a difference.  Similar Wild in Art events have run throughout the country, including The Great Gorillas Project in 2013. Last year Bristol and London had Shaun the Sheep raising funds for Wallace & Grommit’s Children’s Charity.

great-big-rhino-downtheroad

The Rhinos can be seen on the streets until Sunday 9th October. They will be on display at Paignton Zoo from Friday 14th to Sunday 16th October before being auctioned for charity in early November. Money raised by Paignton Zoo’s Great Big Rhino Project will be channelled through Save the Rhino International.

Parkland residents will be visiting Rhino Blossom and Lives in our Hands at Bernaville Garden Centre, Cornerways residents won’t have to travel far to see Rhino Stardust located on Preston green.

great-big-rhino-blossom

Follow the trail here: http://www.greatbigrhinos.org.uk/follow-the-trail

Guest Blog – Gina Awad from the Exeter Dementia Action Alliance

Guest Blog – Gina Awad from the Exeter Dementia Action Alliance

This week our blog is brought to you by Gina Awad who leads the Exeter Dementia Action Alliance (EDAA) which is a voluntary community group that is aspiring to educate local organisations in the city about dementia. The alliance will enable a better understanding of the condition empowering those living with dementia and recognise the invaluable contribution of their families.

Gina is proud to share some of the work the Exeter Dementia Action Alliance as they have been busy behind the scenes creating lasting partnerships in the city.

One which stands out as making an invaluable difference socially for people living with dementia and their families is the Exeter Picturehouse.  This comes first hand from attendees of the three Dementia Friendly Screenings at the cinema in the past few months. The partnership was launched during Dementia Awareness week in May with over 90 attending the first screening. It is now a regular addition to the Picturehouse programme as well as a super trip out for people living with dementia in the community. Those attending have included members of local groups such as The Mede, Age UK, Memory Cafes and a number of Care homes in the area such as Parkland House. All of which are our committed members aspiring to challenge perceptions around dementia and make a lasting difference.

A high percentage of people living with dementia have explained how they can feel isolated and lonely and we believe meaningful engagement, support and compassion all make a significant difference to their wellbeing.

Exeter Picturehouse have been both inspired and moved by the screening response and hub of activity that has accompanied each one.

I personally attended the screenings of the “Calamity Jane Singalong” and “Some Like it Hot” which featured on a Wednesday morning. To witness and partake in the event was both heartening and affirming.

Carers attend free and tickets are just £4 including complimentary tea and coffee during the 20 minute interval. Low lighting, audio adaptions and toilet signage all add to the experience, offering personal comfort. “Nothing is too much trouble for the staff” said one attendee,  “the best morning out in such a long time” said another.

Here are some of the attendees, I think the picture reveals a good time out had by all …

guests-attending-exeter-picturehouse

The next Dementia Friendly screening is at 11am on Wednesday 14th September and will be “Passport to Pimlico”  For booking visit:

https://www.picturehouses.com/cinema/Exeter_Picturehouse/film/passport-to-pimlico

Don’t judge me till you walk a mile in my shoes

Don’t judge me till you walk a mile in my shoes

As the saying goes “walk a mile in my shoes, see what I see, hear what I hear, feel what I feel, then maybe you’ll understand why I do what I do, till then don’t judge me”. Ten Peninsula Care Home staff took part in a virtual Dementia Tour to try and do just that. It is evidence based medically & scientifically proven to be the closest experience that a person with a healthy brain can experience what it might be like to be living with dementia.

Of course every individual is different and over 100 types of dementia the effect on a person will be different. However the eight minute long tour helped our staff be more empathic by experiencing first hand physical and mental challenges potentially facing those living with dementia.

virtual-dementia-tour-participantOur staff described the experience as scary, isolating, confusing and emotional. Personally I was largely frustrated. The facilitator guided you through some common everyday tasks and exercises while you are fitted with devices that alter your senses. My frustration was because I hadn’t heard the instructions, I didn’t know what I was meant to be doing, my vision was distorted, I was fumbling to grip due to the gloves, and the continual noise playing in the headphones was driving me to distraction.

I think as each staff member returned to work they couldn’t help but reflect on their recent experience. Asking themselves how they could be better at their role, how they could improve lives of those in our care by not exacerbating potential problems and by remembering what it may feel like to walk in their shoes.

Peninsula Care Homes hopes to be able to bring the virtual tour back to Devon so more of our staff can experience. If you wish to learn more visit http://www.training2care.co.uk/.